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HotelsinItaly.biz: Information and resource for tourists planning their trip to Italy and their stay in an Italian hotel.

Hotels in Italy is a resource for foreign travellers wishing to get more acquainted with Italy, its habits and laws in order to enjoy a pleasant stay without surprises.



Hotelsinitaly.biz: Not all pets are welcome in any hotel in Italy


 

PET-FRIENDLY HOTELS RULES



 

 

 




  1. The majority of hotels and motels do not allow guests to have pets of any sort in their rooms.


  2. A pet-friendly hotel is a hotel that does allow guests to have a dog, cat, or other small animal in their rooms.


  3. Some pet-friendly hotels do not charge extra for pets. But many charge either a per stay or per night pet fee. These fees are usually non-refundable. A deposit, on the other hand, will usually be refunded if your pet does no damage.


  4. Some hotels are dog-friendly only. Cats are not allowed.


  5. Virtually all hotels will expel dogs that bark and disturb other guests.


  6. Many hotels restrict pets to smoking rooms or to a limited number of "pet rooms."


  7. Be aware that more and more accommodations are requiring proof of the good health of your traveling pet. Even though they are pet friendly, they still want to protect their property, their other guests and their pets.


  8. If you are traveling with your pet, you should always carry a certificate of good health from your veterinarian. This certificate will state that your pet is in good health; free from parasites and that its shot record is up to date. For domestic travel the date on the certificate is not important as long as the shots have not expired. For International travel it should not be more than sixty days, and in some cases 30 days since it was issued.



TRAVELLING WITH PETS:


General advice for anyone who wants or needs to travel with their own pet: we should find out details beforehand, both about the type of transport and organisation we have chosen and about the regulations that apply in any foreign countries we wish to travel to. This is because health regulations vary a lot from one country to the next, whereas rules on means of transportation often vary from operator to operator (airlines and ferry companies, local transport authorities, rail companies, etc.). As far as going abroad is concerned, an official source of information is definitely the local Consulate of the country we wish to visit. We can find the same information at a travel agentís but, unless the information is in writing, it will be difficult to prove the agentís responsibility in the event of any erroneous information that has caused problems. Following are a few general guidelines, which should be considered more in depth, depending on the chosen travel programme.

Pets abroad:
Following EU Regulation 998/2003, in force since July 2004 (and after a transitional phase that ended on 1 October 2004) in the event of travel between member states of the European Union, our pets (dogs, cats, ferrets) must have their own valid passport. This document, issued by the veterinary services of the national health service, indicates the petís tattoo (or microchip) number, certifies that an anti-rabies jab and other vaccinations have been performed, and contains a detailed description of the animal and the ownerís contact details. Also, cats and ferrets must be identified with a microchip placed under the skin, with which it is possible to trace the ownerís contact details. For dogs, instead of a microchip, and for a transitional period of eight years, tattoos are still allowed. For other animals (invertebrates, tropical fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, rodents, rabbits, etc.) only a certificate is required. The new document is valid in all European countries except for United Kingdom, Ireland and Sweden, which require an additional health test for animals entering the countries in order to assess the presence of certain specific antibodies (for example, when entering from non-EU countries).

Health information:
To enter a non-EU country with a dog or other pet, it is necessary to check transport regulations of airlines, ferry or rail companies, and also go to the Consulate of the nation you intend to visit to obtain information on compulsory health requirements: vaccinations, certificates or other health certificates and any quarantine required. These requirements vary from one country to another, and in some countries (South Africa, Hong Kong, Australia, Cuba and others) quarantine can last even up to six months. While the procedures for entering some countries are difficult and complex, there are others, such as the Azores and Greenland, where animals are absolutely prohibited. In any case it is advisable to always bring a health record issued by a veterinarian containing all vaccinations carried out on the cat or dog. Also, for travel abroad, or for travel to non-EU countries and to the United Stated and Canada, the cat or dog must have an international certificate of good health, which is issued by an officially recognised veterinarian (Ministerial Decree 10/4/69) or by an Italian National Health veterinarian in your area of residence.

Pets in cars:
Article 169 of the Italian Highway Code prohibits the transport of pets in all cases in which they might constitute an impediment or danger to driving. Pets, even more than one, can be transported only if they are in a proper cage or container or in the rear end of the car, separated from the driverís seat by a net or any other method. Article 170 allows the transportation of pets on motorcycles and mopeds, as long as they are in a proper cage or container. With the new point-based driving licence, a point can be lost for violation of the rules for transporting pets.

Pets on planes:
Each airline has its own rules. It is therefore worthwhile contacting your airline any time you decide to take a pet on board. In any case, a lot will depend on the weight of the animal: normally, in the case of cats and dogs that weigh less than ten kilos, they can travel with their owner in proper cages; medium or large-size dogs must travel in the pressurised stowage compartment, also in proper cages (in some cases provided by the airlines themselves). Some airlines also provide assistance to pets during the flight and in many airports there are assistance and feeding areas for pets. Normally the price of the ticket is less than an ordinary one; guide dogs for the blind always travel for free. Pets on trains:
Guide dogs for the blind can travel for free on any kind of train. The rules vary for all other kinds of pets. Only small pets can travel in first and second class on Eurostar trains, as long as they are in proper closed cages or containers no larger than 32x32x50 cm placed in the correct spaces. Transport is free. On all other trains small pets in containers no larger than 70x50x30 cm are allowed free of charge. Smaller dogs can travel on the passengerís lap, whereas for larger dogs there is a distinction: they are welcome in carriages with compartments as long as other passengers allow it; in open-plan carriages they must travel under direct supervision of the owner, in the space at the back of the carriages. In both cases, you have to pay 50% of a standard second-class ticket. In couchettes only guide dogs for the blind are allowed in special compartments (free). Finally, in sleeping cars small dogs and other smaller animals are allowed in the compartment entirely occupied by the owner(s) by paying a fixed price of euro 50, including a disinfection charge.

Pets on boats and ferries:
Almost all ferry companies allow transport of pets on board. Some boats are equipped with proper cages, where passengers can put their pet, if required. In any case, a certificate of good health must be presented. On cruise ships, medium-sized and large dogs are not always allowed, whereas smaller dogs are allowed to travel in their ownerís cabin (as long as there are no other passengers in the cabin) and to walk on the deck, obviously on a leash. Guide dogs for the blind can travel for free on any kind of boat.

Pets in taxis and on public transport:
There are no general rules regulating the transportation of pets in taxis; for the moment it is at the driverís discretion whether or not to allow an animal in the taxi. In any case, it will not be necessary to pay a surcharge. On city public transport, regulations can vary from one city to the next and it is up to the local council whether or not to charge for a ticket. In any case medium-sized and large dogs will have to be kept on a leash and wear a muzzle.

 

 

 









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    Home |  Good Tips | About Pets | Wild Flora and Fauna | Charter of the tourist rights |  Rights of the flight passengers | Hotel Contract | Hotel Symbols | Diabetes | Heart disease |  Dialysis | Pros and Cons |  Partner links |  Contact us

    http://www.tredy.com
    http://www.tredytours.com
    http://www.resortsinitaly.com
    http://www.pompeii.org.uk
    http://www.italy-tours.org
    http://www.sorrento.cc